Wednesday, April 18, 2007

(When you wake) You're still in a dream

So as you've all read me wittering on here before, I work long hours. This leaves me in a perpetual state of tiredness, sometimes so exhausted I struggle to stay awake when I want to, and live half of my waking life in some sort of tiredness induced haze.

So, having got all of your sympathy again, there's a point in mentioning this. I often find myself listening to music in the late evening after I have got home from work, usually after a long drive and I need to wind down before going to bed, often sat in front of a computer screen like this with a nice cup of tea or a double whisky if its been a particularly bad day. Listening to music at these times can be an odd experience when tiredness is really pulling at your senses. Trying to focus closely on sounds, dynamics, the ongoing structure of a piece of music becomes hard, the details blur, but as your mind wanders into a semi-dream state certain musics seem to be better to listen to in this condition.
Eliane Radigue's music is often something I will play at a later hour when serious lethargy takes a hold. Morton Feldman's longer pieces are favourites too. Its many years since I last indulged in any kind of stimulant whilst listening to music, but the effect that this level of exhaustion can have on the listening experience is not so far away from that sensation.

I am this week trying to finish writing a review of the i and e festival I attended in Dublin recently. I arrived in Dublin on the morning of the first evening of music without having slept the night before, and then due to the ridiculously jobsworthy staff at the hotel I was staying at I could not get my head down for a few hours sleep until very late in the afternoon. The result of all this was I arrived for the first evening's music in a somewhat dazed state, and I'm sure my perception of the music I heard that night was affected by this. Everything seemed to drift along in a dreamy manner, and whilst I have listened to recordings of the sets since and I know that the music was all of a high standard, on the evening I enjoyed everything immensely, perhaps because of my physical state.

Not sure why I'm telling you all of this, but I type this at half-past midnight after a long long day that saw me get home at 11PM after fifteen hours work, and right now Taku Sugimoto's Live in Australia sounds good in the background as my exhaustion begins to take hold and maybe now its time to...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz......

3 comments:

jon abbey said...

coming down with a fever is another interesting filter, I remember being totally blown away by Fellini's 8 1/2 in this state once and thinking that it was the perfect frame of mind for the film (possibly my favorite film of all time, if forced to choose one).

Richard Pinnell said...

Most of the illnesses I've experienced in recent years have been linked to exhaustion, but I do remember a few years back being completely stuffed up in my sinuses etc and my hearing suffering. I had a high pitched whistling in my ears for a couple of days, and everything I listened to during that time sounded like Sachiko M had been added to the bill.

Anonymous said...

i seem to have developed hive all over me, due to exhaustion :s

patrick